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Work. 2014;47(2):207-11. doi: 10.3233/WOR-131670.

The effect of tablet tilt angle on users' preferences, postures, and performance.

Author information

1
High Plains Engineering Services, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
2
Microsoft, Redmond, WA, USA T-Mobile, Redmond, WA, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Tablets and other mobile devices can be tilted during use. This study examined the effect of tablet tilt angles on reading performance, target-tapping performance, wrist and forearm posture, user comfort and users' tilt angle preferences.

METHOD:

Ten participants used tablets alternating among four different tilt angles: 0°, 30°, 45°, 60° and a user selected angle. Head, neck, wrist and forearm postural data were collected, along with reading and target-tapping performance. Subjective, perceived impressions were gathered via Likert scale questions.

RESULTS:

Neck flexion decreased significantly as tilt angle increased. The extreme tilt angles, 0° and 60°, were least preferred while the self-chosen tilt angle, averaging about 34°, was most preferred. Tapping performance was significantly better for the self-chosen tilt angle; however, this may be a practice effect. No effect of tilt was observed on reading performance or for forearm and wrist posture.

CONCLUSIONS:

Tablet tilt angles should include a range of 20° to 50° at minimum.

KEYWORDS:

Tablet; head neck posture; mobile computing; slate computing; tilt

PMID:
24004729
DOI:
10.3233/WOR-131670
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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