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Biomed Res Int. 2013;2013:852195. doi: 10.1155/2013/852195. Epub 2013 Aug 13.

Role of Campylobacter jejuni infection in the pathogenesis of Guillain-Barré syndrome: an update.

Author information

1
Immune Regulation Laboratory, World Premier International-Immunology Frontier Research Center (WPI-IFReC), Osaka University, Osaka 865-0871, Japan. kishan.nyati@yahoo.com

Abstract

Our current knowledge on Campylobacter jejuni infections in humans has progressively increased over the past few decades. Infection with C. jejuni is the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis, sometimes surpassing other infections due to Salmonella, Shigella, and Escherichia coli. Most infections are acquired due to consumption of raw or undercooked poultry, unpasteurized milk, and contaminated water. After developing the diagnostic methods to detect C. jejuni, the possibility to identify the association of its infection with new diseases has been increased. After the successful isolation of C. jejuni, reports have been published citing the occurrence of GBS following C. jejuni infection. Thus, C. jejuni is now considered as a major triggering agent of GBS. Molecular mimicry between sialylated lipooligosaccharide structures on the cell envelope of these bacteria and ganglioside epitopes on the human nerves that generates cross-reactive immune response results in autoimmune-driven nerve damage. Though C. jejuni is associated with several pathologic forms of GBS, axonal subtypes following C. jejuni infection may be more severe. Ample amount of existing data covers a large spectrum of GBS; however, the studies on C. jejuni-associated GBS are still inconclusive. Therefore, this review provides an update on the C. jejuni infections engaged in the pathogenesis of GBS.

PMID:
24000328
PMCID:
PMC3755430
DOI:
10.1155/2013/852195
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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