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Cytotherapy. 2014 Jan;16(1):56-63. doi: 10.1016/j.jcyt.2013.06.002. Epub 2013 Aug 30.

Marrow mesenchymal stromal cells reduce methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in rat models.

Author information

1
Department of Food Quality and Safety, College of Agriculture, Jilin University, Changchun, China.
2
College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Jilin University, Changchun, China.
3
Department of Food Quality and Safety, College of Agriculture, Jilin University, Changchun, China. Electronic address: yehq@jlu.edu.cn.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AIMS:

Staphylococci account for a large proportion of hospital-acquired infections, especially among patients with indwelling devices. These infections are often caused by biofilm-producing strains, which are difficult to eradicate and may eventually cause bacteremia and metastatic infections. Recent evidence suggests that mesenchymal stem cells can enhance bacterial clearance in vivo.

METHODS:

In this study, a rat model with carboxymethyl cellulose pouch infection was used to analyze the efficacy of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) against the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

RESULTS:

The results showed that the administration of BMSCs effectively reduced the number of bacterial colonies and the expression of many cytokines and chemokines (such as interleukin [IL]-6, IL-1β, IL-10 and CCL5). Unlike the fibroblast control groups, the pouch tissues from the BMSC-treated rats showed the formation of granulations, suggesting that the healing of the wound was in progress.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results indicate that the treatment of BMSCs can reduce methicillin-resistant S aureus infection in vivo, thereby reducing the inflammatory response.

KEYWORDS:

mesenchymal stromal cells; methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; rat models

PMID:
23993644
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcyt.2013.06.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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