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J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2014 Feb;133(2):370-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2013.06.043. Epub 2013 Aug 29.

A genome-wide association study of bronchodilator response in Latinos implicates rare variants.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, Calif.
2
Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, Calif. Electronic address: dara.torgerson@ucsf.edu.
3
Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, Calif.
4
Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.
5
Children's Hospital and Research Center Oakland, Oakland, Calif.
6
Department of Health Sciences, Graduate Program in Public Health, Lehman College, City University of New York, Bronx, New York.
7
Department of Pediatrics, Section of Pulmonology, Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Tex.
8
Children's Memorial Hospital, and the Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Ill.
9
Division of Allergy-Immunology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Ill.
10
Department of Allergy and Immunology, Kaiser Permanente-Vallejo Medical Center, Vallejo, Calif.
11
Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias (INER), Mexico City, Mexico.
12
Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Md.
13
Bay Area Pediatrics, Oakland, Calif.
14
Sonoma Technologies, Petaluma, Calif.
15
Pediatric Pulmonary Division, Jacobi Medical Center, Bronx, New York.
16
Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, Calif.
17
Veterans Caribbean Health Care System, San Juan, Puerto Rico.
18
Department of Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, Calif.
19
Centro de Neumologia Pediatrica, San Juan, Puerto Rico.
20
Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, Calif; Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, Calif.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The primary rescue medication to treat acute asthma exacerbation is the short-acting β₂-adrenergic receptor agonist; however, there is variation in how well a patient responds to treatment. Although these differences might be due to environmental factors, there is mounting evidence for a genetic contribution to variability in bronchodilator response (BDR).

OBJECTIVE:

To identify genetic variation associated with bronchodilator drug response in Latino children with asthma.

METHODS:

We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for BDR in 1782 Latino children with asthma using standard linear regression, adjusting for genetic ancestry and ethnicity, and performed replication studies in an additional 531 Latinos. We also performed admixture mapping across the genome by testing for an association between local European, African, and Native American ancestry and BDR, adjusting for genomic ancestry and ethnicity.

RESULTS:

We identified 7 genetic variants associated with BDR at a genome-wide significant threshold (P < 5 × 10(-8)), all of which had frequencies of less than 5%. Furthermore, we observed an excess of small P values driven by rare variants (frequency, <5%) and by variants in the proximity of solute carrier (SLC) genes. Admixture mapping identified 5 significant peaks; fine mapping within these peaks identified 2 rare variants in SLC22A15 as being associated with increased BDR in Mexicans. Quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry identified SLC22A15 as being expressed in the lung and bronchial epithelial cells.

CONCLUSION:

Our results suggest that rare variation contributes to individual differences in response to albuterol in Latinos, notably in SLC genes that include membrane transport proteins involved in the transport of endogenous metabolites and xenobiotics. Resequencing in larger, multiethnic population samples and additional functional studies are required to further understand the role of rare variation in BDR.

KEYWORDS:

BDR; Bronchodilator response; GALA I; GALA II; GWAS; Genes-Environments & Admixture in Latino Americans; Genetics of Asthma in Latino Americans; Genome-wide association study; IGF; Insulin-like growth factor; LD; Latinos; Linkage disequilibrium; MAF; Minor allele frequency; QC; Quality control; SABA; SLC; SNP; Short-acting β(2)-adrenergic receptor agonist; Single nucleotide polymorphism; Solute carrier; admixture mapping; asthma; genome-wide association study; rare variants; β(2)-Adrenergic receptor; β(2)AR

PMID:
23992748
PMCID:
PMC3938989
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaci.2013.06.043
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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