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Prosthet Orthot Int. 2014 Aug;38(4):321-31. doi: 10.1177/0309364613499064. Epub 2013 Aug 28.

Self-reported prosthetic sock use among persons with transtibial amputation.

Author information

  • 1Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
  • 2Department of Rehabilitation Medicine University of Washington,Seattle, WA, USA bhafner@uw.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Daily changes in the shape and size of the residual limb affect prosthetic socket fit. Prosthetic socks are often added or removed to manage changes in limb volume. Little has been published about how persons with transtibial amputations use socks to manage diurnal changes in volume and comfort.

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate prosthetic sock use with a customized, self-report questionnaire.

STUDY DESIGN:

Cross-sectional survey.

METHODS:

Persons with transtibial amputation reported number, thickness, and timing of socks used over a 14-day period.

RESULTS:

Data from 23 subjects (16 males and 7 females) were included. On average, socks were changed less than once per day (0.6/day) and ply increased over the day (4.8-5.5 ply). Subjects wore prostheses significantly longer (15.0-14.1 h, p = 0.02) and changed socks significantly more often (0.6/day-0.4/day, p = 0.03) on weekdays compared to weekends. Participants were also divided into two subgroups: those who used socks to manage limb volume and those who used socks for socket comfort. Sock use did not differ (p > 0.05) between subgroups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Sock changes are infrequent among persons with lower limb loss. Initial, verbal reports of sock use were often inconsistent with data measured by logs. Tools (e.g. sock logs or objective instruments) to better understand sock-use habits among persons with limb loss are needed.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

Knowledge of prosthetic patients' sock use may help practitioners enhance volume management strategies or troubleshoot fitting issues. Results showed that subjects generally added socks to account for volume loss, and end-of-day sock thickness frequently exceeded 5 ply. Use of sock logs in clinical practice may facilitate improved residual limb health.

KEYWORDS:

Volume management; prosthetic socks; questionnaires; residual limb volume

PMID:
23986464
PMCID:
PMC4438706
DOI:
10.1177/0309364613499064
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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