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J Neurosci. 2013 Aug 28;33(35):14117-34. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2172-13.2013.

Differences in neural activation for object-directed grasping in chimpanzees and humans.

Author information

1
Department of Anthropology, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA. ehecht@emory.edu

Abstract

The human faculty for object-mediated action, including tool use and imitation, exceeds that of even our closest primate relatives and is a key foundation of human cognitive and cultural uniqueness. In humans and macaques, observing object-directed grasping actions activates a network of frontal, parietal, and occipitotemporal brain regions, but differences in human and macaque activation suggest that this system has been a focus of selection in the primate lineage. To study the evolution of this system, we performed functional neuroimaging in humans' closest living relatives, chimpanzees. We compare activations during performance of an object-directed manual grasping action, observation of the same action, and observation of a mimed version of the action that consisted of only movements without results. Performance and observation of the same action activated a distributed frontoparietal network similar to that reported in macaques and humans. Like humans and unlike macaques, these regions were also activated by observing movements without results. However, in a direct chimpanzee/human comparison, we also identified unique aspects of human neural responses to observed grasping. Chimpanzee activation showed a prefrontal bias, including significantly more activity in ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, whereas human activation was more evenly distributed across more posterior regions, including significantly more activation in ventral premotor cortex, inferior parietal cortex, and inferotemporal cortex. This indicates a more "bottom-up" representation of observed action in the human brain and suggests that the evolution of tool use, social learning, and cumulative culture may have involved modifications of frontoparietal interactions.

PMID:
23986247
PMCID:
PMC3756757
DOI:
10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2172-13.2013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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