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Mol Ther. 2014 Jan;22(1):149-59. doi: 10.1038/mt.2013.194. Epub 2013 Aug 28.

Exploiting human CD34+ stem cell-conditioned medium for tissue repair.

Author information

1
1] Department of Surgery and Cancer, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK [2] Qatar Biomedical Research Institute, Education City, Doha, Qatar.
2
1] Department of Surgery & Hepatitis Research Center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei City, Taiwan [2] Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei City, Taiwan.
3
Department of Surgery and Cancer, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK.
4
Department of Haematology, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK.
5
1] Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway [2] Department of Computer and Information Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
6
Department of Medicine, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, USA.
7
Qatar Biomedical Research Institute, Education City, Doha, Qatar.
8
1] Qatar Biomedical Research Institute, Education City, Doha, Qatar [2] Department of Virology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt.
9
Division of Molecular Biology, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope, Duarte, California, USA.

Abstract

Despite the progress in our understanding of genes essential for stem cell regulation and development, little is known about the factors secreted by stem cells and their effect on tissue regeneration. In particular, the factors secreted by human CD34+ cells remain to be elucidated. We have approached this challenge by performing a cytokine/growth factor microarray analysis of secreted soluble factors in medium conditioned by adherent human CD34+ cells. Thirty-two abundantly secreted factors have been identified, all of which are associated with cell proliferation, survival, tissue repair, and wound healing. The cultured CD34+ cells expressed known stem cell genes such as Nanog, Oct4, Sox2, c-kit, and HoxB4. The conditioned medium containing the secreted factors prevented cell death in liver cells exposed to liver toxin in vitro via inhibition of the caspase-3 signaling pathway. More importantly, in vivo studies using animal models of liver damage demonstrated that injection of the conditioned medium could repair damaged liver tissue (significant reduction in the necroinflammatory activity), as well as enable the animals to survive. Thus, we demonstrate that medium conditioned by human CD34+ cells has the potential for therapeutic repair of damaged tissue in vivo.

PMID:
23985698
PMCID:
PMC3978788
DOI:
10.1038/mt.2013.194
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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