Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nurse Educ Today. 2014 Apr;34(4):501-6. doi: 10.1016/j.nedt.2013.07.009. Epub 2013 Aug 24.

Connecting in distance mentoring: communication practices that work.

Author information

1
Oregon Health & Science University School of Nursing, Portland, OR, United States. Electronic address: lasaterk@ohsu.edu.
2
Minnesota State University, Mankato, Mankato, MN, United States.
3
University of Cincinnati College of Nursing, Cincinnati, OH, United States.
4
Bryan College of Health Sciences, Lincoln, NE, United States.
5
Loma Linda University School of Nursing, Loma Linda, CA, United States.
6
Ball State University School of Nursing, Muncie, IN, United States.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

As nursing and healthcare become more global, supported by technology, the opportunities for distance mentoring increase. Mentorship is critical to nurse educator recruitment and retention.

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to identify communication practices of nurse educators involved in mentoring at a distance.

DESIGN/SETTINGS:

A qualitative design, utilizing in-person or telephone interviews was used. Participants were twenty-three protégés or mentors who were part of a yearlong distance mentoring program.

ANALYSIS METHOD:

An iterative process of hermeneutic analysis identified three themes; this paper focuses on the theme of connectedness.

RESULTS:

Participant narratives illuminate practices of connecting at a distance: meeting face-to-face, sharing personal information, experiencing reciprocity, journaling, being vulnerable, establishing one's presence, and appreciating different perspectives.

CONCLUSION:

Distance does not appear to limit the connecting potential leading to a meaningful mentoring relationship; rather, it offers possibilities that local mentoring relationships may not. Nurse educators in under-resourced countries, those in small programs without a cadre of senior faculty, and students in distance programs are among those who stand to benefit from distance mentoring relationships.

KEYWORDS:

Distance learning; Distance mentoring; Faculty, nursing; Mentoring; Nursing education; Qualitative

PMID:
23978777
DOI:
10.1016/j.nedt.2013.07.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center