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J Pain Symptom Manage. 2014 Mar;47(3):579-587.e6. doi: 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2013.04.009. Epub 2013 Aug 21.

Assessment of reasons for referral and activities of hospital palliative care teams using a standard format: a multicenter 1000 case description.

Author information

1
Division of Health Innovation and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan. Electronic address: tsasahara@md.tsukuba.ac.jp.
2
Saito-Yukokai Hospital, Osaka, Japan.
3
Department of Palliative Medicine, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
4
Palliative Care Team, Seirei Mikatahara General Hospital, Shizuoka, Japan.
5
Tsukuba Medical Center Hospital, Ibaraki, Japan.
6
Department of Palliative Care, Teine Keijinkai Hospital, Hokkaido, Japan.
7
Palliative Care Unit, NTT Medical Center Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
8
Children's Hospice Hospital, Yodogawa Christian Hospital, Osaka, Japan.
9
Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, Japan.
10
Niizashiki Central General Hospital, Saitama, Japan.
11
Department of Palliative Medicine, National Cancer Center Hospital, East, Chiba, Japan.
12
Palliative Care Team, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan.
13
Department of Chest Surgery, Toyama Red Cross Hospital, Toyama, Japan.
14
Department of Palliative Care, Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan.
15
Department of Anesthesiology and Palliative Medicine, Chiba University Hospital, Chiba, Japan.
16
Division of Palliative Medicine, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Shizuoka, Japan.
17
Division of Chemotherapy and Palliative Care, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Kanagawa, Japan.
18
Kameda Medical Center, Chiba, Japan.
19
Palliative Care Unit, Shakaihoken Kobe Central Hospital, Hyogo, Japan.
20
Department of Palliative Medicine, Shizuoka Saiseikai General Hospital, Shizuoka, Japan.
21
Matsuyama Red Cross Hospital, Ehime, Japan.
22
Department of General Internal Medicine, Saku Central Hospital, Nagano, Japan.
23
Department of Palliative Care, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama, Japan.
24
Department of Palliative and Supportive Care, Palliative Care Team and Seirei Hospice, Seirei Mikatahara General Hospital, Shizuoka, Japan.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

The many benefits of hospital palliative care teams (PCTs) are well known. However, their specific activities have not been fully clarified, and no standardized methods for reporting PCT activities are available.

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study was to investigate, through the use of a standard format, the activities performed by hospital PCTs in Japan.

METHODS:

This was a prospective observational study. A total of 21 hospital PCTs were included in this study, and each recruited approximately 50 consecutively referred patients. Participating PCTs filled in a standard form for reporting activities.

RESULTS:

We obtained data from 1055 patients who were referred to PCTs. Of the 1055 patients, 1005 patients (95%) had cancer. The median number of reasons for referral and problems identified by PCTs was two (0-22) and four (0-18), respectively. The two major reasons for referral were pain (63%) and anxiety/depression/grief/emotional burden (22%). The major recommendations were pharmacological treatment (74%), care for the patient's physical symptoms (49%), and support for patient's decision making (38%). The major activities performed by the PCTs were comprehensive assessment (90%), care for the patient's physical symptoms (77%), and pharmacological treatment (74%).

CONCLUSION:

The components of hospital PCT activities were successfully measured using the Standard Format for Reporting Hospital PCT Activity. The results of this study and the format for reporting hospital PCT activity could be effective in improving hospital PCT practice and for the education of new hospital PCT members.

KEYWORDS:

Palliative care; activity; consultation; hospital palliative care team; multicenter study

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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