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J Pediatr. 2013 Dec;163(6):1764-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2013.07.005. Epub 2013 Aug 20.

Pediatric global health education: correlation of website information and curriculum.

Author information

1
Department of International Health, Center for American Indian Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. Electronic address: jyaeger@jhsph.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Web sites describing residency programs are initial sources of information for applicants. The correlation of global health content on pediatric residency program Web sites with reported curricula is unknown. To determine the accuracy of global health education, information on program Web sites was compared with queried program content responses.

STUDY DESIGN:

The Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database was used to assess pediatric residency programs' Web sites for global health education, applying American Academy of Pediatrics consensus guidelines. The authors developed a questionnaire using these consensus guidelines and contacted each program to assess Web site findings, and χ(2) tests were used to compare data from these 2 sources.

RESULTS:

Of 194 programs, 177 had operational Web sites, of which 98 participated in the questionnaire (55%). Ninety-three of 177 programs (53%) reported global health education on Web sites, whereas 80 of 98 programs (82%) reported global health education through direct questioning (P < .001). Results include provision of resident salaries during global health elective (Web site 5% vs questionnaire 98%, P < .001), mandatory training before global health elective (8% vs 20%, P = .02), presence of global health elective curriculum (24% vs 75%, P < .001), postexperience debriefing (16% vs 29%, P = .05), and bidirectional resident exchange (2% vs 13%, P = .01).

CONCLUSIONS:

Results indicate continued expansion of pediatric global health education, but significant differences exist between information on Web sites and data obtained through direct questioning. Accurate representation of global health opportunities would allow for more informed decision-making among prospective applicants. Findings also suggest substantial variability in global health curricula that needs to be addressed through improved planning and cooperation among training programs.

KEYWORDS:

AAP; American Academy of Pediatrics; CGICE; Consensus Guidelines for International Child Health Electives; FREIDA; Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database

PMID:
23968746
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2013.07.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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