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J Pediatr. 2013 Nov;163(5):1402-8.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2013.06.081. Epub 2013 Aug 20.

Parent support improves weight loss in adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome.

Author information

1
Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Waltham, MA. Electronic address: Carol.Curtin@umassmed.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess whether parent training in behavioral intervention, combined with a 16-session nutrition and activity education program, would improve weight loss relative to nutrition and activity education alone in adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome.

STUDY DESIGN:

Twenty-one patients with Down syndrome aged 13-26 years with a body mass index ≥ 85 th percentile were enrolled and randomized to a 6-month nutrition and activity education intervention (n = 10) or to a nutrition and activity education+behaviorial intervention (n = 11), and followed for 6 months after the active intervention period (1-year follow-up). The primary outcome measure was body weight; secondary outcomes included percentage body fat by bioelectric impedance; intake of fruits, vegetables, and energy-dense low-nutrient snack food (treats) by 3-day food record; and moderate/vigorous physical activity by accelerometry.

RESULTS:

At 6 months, mean body weight in the nutrition and activity education+behavioral intervention group was 3.2 kg lower than that in the nutrition and activity education group (95% CI, 1.0-5.5 kg; P = .005). Mean group differences were sustained at 1 year (3.6 kg; 95% CI, 1.4-5.9 kg; P = .002). At 6 months, moderate/vigorous physical activity time increased by an average of 18 minutes/day compared with baseline in the nutrition and activity education+behavioral intervention group (P = .01) and decreased by 7 minutes/day in the nutrition and activity education group (P = .30). These changes were largely maintained at 1 year, but were not statistically significant. Vegetable intake in the nutrition and activity education+behavioral intervention group exceeded that in the nutrition and activity education group by a mean of 1.6 servings at 1 year (P = .009), but not at 6 months. No between-group differences were observed for percentage body fat or consumption of fruits or treats.

CONCLUSION:

Parent-supported behavioral intervention appears to be a successful adjunct to a 6-month nutrition education intervention in achieving weight loss in adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01256112.

KEYWORDS:

%fat; Percentage body fat

PMID:
23968742
PMCID:
PMC3812279
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2013.06.081
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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