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Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep. 2013 Oct;13(10):386. doi: 10.1007/s11910-013-0386-8.

The functional anatomy of impulse control disorders.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Christian Albrechts University, Kiel, Germany. c.probst@neurologie.uni-kiel.de

Abstract

Impulsive-compulsive disorders such as pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive eating, and shopping are side effects of the dopaminergic therapy for Parkinson's disease. With a lower prevalence, these disorders also appear in the general population. Research in the last few years has discovered that these pathological behaviors share features similar to those of substance use disorders (SUD), which has led to the term "behavioral addictions". As in SUDs, the behaviors are marked by a compulsive drive toward and impaired control over the behavior. Furthermore, animal and medication studies, research in the Parkinson's disease population, and neuroimaging findings indicate a common neurobiology of addictive behaviors. Changes associated with addictions are mainly seen in the dopaminergic system of a mesocorticolimbic circuit, the so-called reward system. Here we outline neurobiological findings regarding behavioral addictions with a focus on dopaminergic systems, relate them to SUD theories, and try to build a tentative concept integrating genetics, neuroimaging, and behavioral results.

PMID:
23963609
PMCID:
PMC3779310
DOI:
10.1007/s11910-013-0386-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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