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Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol. 2013;2013:428582. doi: 10.1155/2013/428582. Epub 2013 Jul 16.

Multicenter study of human papillomavirus and the human papillomavirus vaccine: knowledge and attitudes among people of African descent.

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Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA 19111, USA.



To compare knowledge and attitudes of human papillomavirus (HPV) and the vaccine between different cultures of African descent.


A cross-sectional survey of 555 African-Americans and Afro-Caribbeans residing in the US and the Bahamas (BHM) was conducted.


General knowledge about HPV and the HPV vaccine differed between the two countries significantly. Bahamian respondents were less likely to have higher numbers of correct knowledge answers when compared to Americans (Adjusted Odds Ratio [Adj. OR] 0.47, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 0.30-0.75). Older age, regardless of location, was also associated with answering fewer questions correctly (Adj. OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.40-0.92). Attitudes related to HPV vaccination were similar between the US and BHM, but nearly 80% of BHM respondents felt that children should not be able to receive the vaccine without parental consent compared to 57% of American respondents.


Grave lack of knowledge, safety and cost concerns, and influence of parental restrictions may negatively impact vaccine uptake among African-American and Afro-Caribbean persons. Interventions to increase the vaccine uptake in the Caribbean must include medical provider and parental involvement. Effective strategies for education and increasing vaccine uptake in BHM are crucial for decreasing cervical cancer burden in the Caribbean.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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