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Appl Environ Microbiol. 2013 Nov;79(21):6576-84. doi: 10.1128/AEM.02137-13. Epub 2013 Aug 16.

Exoproteome profiles of Clostridium cellulovorans grown on various carbon sources.

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1
Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

Abstract

The cellulosome is a complex of cellulosomal proteins bound to scaffolding proteins. This complex is considered the most efficient system for cellulose degradation. Clostridium cellulovorans, which is known to produce cellulosomes, changes the composition of its cellulosomes depending on the growth substrates. However, studies have investigated only cellulosomal proteins; profile changes in noncellulosomal proteins have rarely been examined. In this study, we performed a quantitative proteome analysis of the whole exoproteome of C. cellulovorans, including cellulosomal and noncellulosomal proteins, to illustrate how various substrates are efficiently degraded. C. cellulovorans was cultured with cellobiose, xylan, pectin, or phosphoric acid-swollen cellulose (PASC) as the sole carbon source. PASC was used as a cellulose substrate for more accurate quantitative analysis. Using an isobaric tag method and a liquid chromatography mass spectrometer equipped with a long monolithic silica capillary column, 639 proteins were identified and quantified in all 4 samples. Among these, 79 proteins were involved in saccharification, including 35 cellulosomal and 44 noncellulosomal proteins. We compared protein abundance by spectral count and found that cellulosomal proteins were more abundant than noncellulosomal proteins. Next, we focused on the fold change of the proteins depending on the growth substrates. Drastic changes were observed mainly among the noncellulosomal proteins. These results indicate that cellulosomal proteins were primarily produced to efficiently degrade any substrate and that noncellulosomal proteins were specifically produced to optimize the degradation of a particular substrate. This study highlights the importance of noncellulosomal proteins as well as cellulosomes for the efficient degradation of various substrates.

PMID:
23956399
PMCID:
PMC3811513
DOI:
10.1128/AEM.02137-13
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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