Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Health Policy Plan. 2014 Sep;29(6):742-52. doi: 10.1093/heapol/czt058. Epub 2013 Aug 16.

The size, characteristics and partnership networks of the health-related non-profit sector in three regions of South Africa: implications of changing primary health care policy for community-based care.

Author information

1
Centre for Higher Education Development, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, 7701, South Africa, Department of Health, Behavior and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, School of Public Health, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg and Earth Institute, Columbia University, NYC and School of Public Health, University of the Western Cape, South Africa ermien.vanpletzen@uct.ac.za.
2
Centre for Higher Education Development, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, 7701, South Africa, Department of Health, Behavior and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, School of Public Health, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg and Earth Institute, Columbia University, NYC and School of Public Health, University of the Western Cape, South Africa.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Health-related community-based care in South Africa is mostly provided through non-profit organizations (NPOs), but little is known about the sector. In the light of emerging government policy on greater formalization of community-based care in South Africa, this article assesses the size, characteristics and partnership networks of health-related NPOs in three South African communities and explores implications of changing primary health care policy for this sector.

METHODS:

Data were collected (2009-11) from three sites: Khayelitsha (urban), Botshabelo (semi-rural) and Bushbuckridge (semi/deep rural). Separate data sources were used to identify all health-related NPOs in the sites. Key characteristics of identified NPOs were gathered using a standardized tool. A typology of NPOs was developed combining level of resources (well, moderate, poor) and orientation of activities ('Direct service', 'Developmental' and/or 'Activist'). Network analysis was performed to establish degree and density of partnerships among NPOs.

RESULTS:

The 138 NPOs (n = 56 in Khayelitsha, n = 47 in Bushbuckridge; n = 35 in Botshabelo) were mostly local community-based organizations (CBOs). The main NPO orientation was 'Direct service' (n = 120, 87%). Well- and moderately resourced NPOs were successful at combining orientations. Most organizations with an 'Activist' orientation were urban. No poorly resourced organizations had this orientation. Well-resourced organizations with an 'Activist' orientation were highly connected in Khayelitsha NPO networks, while poorly resourced CBOs were marginalized. A contrasting picture emerged in Botshabelo where CBOs were highly connected. Networks in Bushbuckridge were fragmented and linear.

CONCLUSIONS:

The NPO sector varies geographically in numbers, resources, orientation of activities and partnership networks. NPOs may perform important developmental roles and strong potential for social capital may reside in organizational networks operating in otherwise impoverished environments. A uniform approach to policy implementation may not accommodate variations in the NPO sector. Considerations for adaptation may be necessary in light of the observed differences between urban and rural settings.

KEYWORDS:

Health-related non-profit organizations; South Africa; community-based care; policy on primary health care

PMID:
23955608
DOI:
10.1093/heapol/czt058
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
    Loading ...
    Support Center