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Phys Ther Sport. 2014 Feb;15(1):64-75. doi: 10.1016/j.ptsp.2013.07.002. Epub 2013 Aug 16.

The biomechanical variables involved in the aetiology of iliotibial band syndrome in distance runners - A systematic review of the literature.

Author information

1
Department of Physiotherapy, School of Health Professions, University of Brighton, UK. Electronic address: maryke.louw@gmail.com.
2
Department of Physiotherapy, School of Health Professions, University of Brighton, UK.

Abstract

The aim of this literature review was to identify the biomechanical variables involved in the aetiology of iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS) in distance runners. An electronic search was conducted using the terms "iliotibial band" and "iliotibial tract". The results showed that runners with a history of ITBS appear to display decreased rear foot eversion, tibial internal rotation and hip adduction angles at heel strike while having greater maximum internal rotation angles at the knee and decreased total abduction and adduction range of motion at the hip during stance phase. They further appear to experience greater invertor momentsĀ at their feet, decreased abduction and flexion velocities at their hips and to reach maximum hip flexion angles earlier than healthy controls. Maximum normalised braking forces seem to be decreased in these athletes. The literature is inconclusive with regards to muscle strength deficits in runners with a history of ITBS. Prospective research suggested that greater internal rotation at the knee joint and increased adduction angles of the hip may play a role in the aetiology of ITBS and that the strain rate in the iliotibial bands of these runners may be increased compared to healthy controls. A clear biomechanical cause for ITBS could not be devised due to the lack of prospective research.

KEYWORDS:

Aetiology; Biomechanics; Iliotibial band syndrome

PMID:
23954385
DOI:
10.1016/j.ptsp.2013.07.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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