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J Neurosci Methods. 2013 Oct 15;219(2):324-30. doi: 10.1016/j.jneumeth.2013.08.003. Epub 2013 Aug 14.

An inexpensive, charge-balanced rodent deep brain stimulation device: a step-by-step guide to its procurement and construction.

Author information

1
Bereich Experimentelle Psychiatrie, Universitätsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus TU Dresden, Fetscherstrasse 74, D-01307 Dresden, Germany; Departments of Neuroscience, Psychiatry and Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, A210 Langley Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA. Electronic address: sam.ewing@gmail.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Despite there being a relatively large number of methods papers which detail specifically the development of stimulation devices, only a small number of reports involve the application of these devices in freely moving animals. To date multiple preclinical neural stimulators have been designed and described but have failed to make an impact on the methods employed by the majority of laboratories studying DBS. Thus, the overwhelming majority of DBS studies are still performed by tethering the subject to an external stimulator. We believe that the low adoption rate of previously described methods is a result of the complexity of replicating and implementing these methods.

NEW METHOD:

Here were describe both the design and procurement of a simple and inexpensive stimulator designed to be compatible with commonly used, commercially available electrodes (Plastics 1).

RESULTS:

This system is initially programmable in frequency, pulsewidth and current amplitude, and delivers biphasic, charge-balanced output to two independent electrodes.

COMPARISON WITH EXISTING METHOD(S):

It is easy to implement requiring neither subcutaneous implantation nor custom-made electrodes and has been optimized for either direct mounting to the head or for use with rodent jackets.

CONCLUSIONS:

This device is inexpensive and universally accessible, facilitating high throughput, low cost, long-term rodent deep brain stimulation experiments.

KEYWORDS:

Bilateral; Charge-balanced; Chronic; Deep brain stimulation; Programmable; Rodent

PMID:
23954265
PMCID:
PMC3809915
DOI:
10.1016/j.jneumeth.2013.08.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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