Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Talanta. 2013 Sep 30;114:183-90. doi: 10.1016/j.talanta.2013.03.050. Epub 2013 Mar 28.

Visible-light-driven photocatalytic and chemical sensing properties of SnS2 nanoflakes.

Author information

1
Department of Chemistry, College of Science and Arts, Najran University, P.O. Box 1988, Najran 11001, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. ahmadumar786@gmail.com

Abstract

This work demonstrated the successful and facile large-scale synthesis and characterizations of SnS2 nanoflakes. The detailed morphological studies revealed that the synthesized products were nanoflakes and were grown in large quantity. The XRD pattern and detailed compositional studies confirmed that the synthesized SnS2 nanoflakes were well-crystalline and possessing hexagonal SnS2 phase. The synthesized SnS2 nanoflakes were used as efficient photocatalysts for photocatalytic degradation and effective electron mediators for the fabrication of chemical sensor. The photocatalytic properties of SnS2 nanoflakes towards the photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B dye under visible light irradiation showed reasonably good degradation of ~61%. Moreover, the as-synthesized SnS2 nanoflakes were used as efficient electron mediators for the fabrication of nitroaniline chemical sensor by simple I-V technique. Very high-sensitivity of ~ 505.82±0.02 mAcm(-2).(mole/L)(-1) and experimental detection limit of ~15×10(-6) (mole/L) in a short response time of ~10.0 s with LDR in the range of 15.6×10(-6)-0.5×10(-3) mole L(-1) were observed for the fabricated nitroaniline chemical sensor. The observed results indicated that the SnS2 nanoflakes can efficiently be used as visible-light-driven photocatalysts and the fabrication of ultra-high sensitive chemical sensors.

KEYWORDS:

Chemical sensors; Nanoflakes; Nitroaniline; Photocatalytic degradation; Rhodamine B; SnS(2)

PMID:
23953459
DOI:
10.1016/j.talanta.2013.03.050
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center