Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
NeuroRehabilitation. 2013;33(1):77-84. doi: 10.3233/NRE-130930.

Evidence of end-effector based gait machines in gait rehabilitation after CNS lesion.

Author information

1
Medical Park Berlin Humboldtmühle, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany. s.hesse@medicalpark.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A task-specific repetitive approach in gait rehabilitation after CNS lesion is well accepted nowadays. To ease the therapists' and patients' physical effort, the past two decades have seen the introduction of gait machines to intensify the amount of gait practice. Two principles have emerged, an exoskeleton- and an endeffector-based approach. Both systems share the harness and the body weight support. With the end-effector-based devices, the patients' feet are positioned on two foot plates, whose movements simulate stance and swing phase.

OBJECTIVE:

This article provides an overview on the end-effector based machine's effectiveness regarding the restoration of gait.

METHODS:

For the electromechanical gait trainer GT I, a meta analysis identified nine controlled trials (RCT) in stroke subjects (n = 568) and were analyzed to detect differences between end-effector-based locomotion + physiotherapy and physiotherapy alone.

RESULTS:

Patients practising with the machine effected in a superior gait ability (210 out of 319 patients, 65.8% vs. 96 out of 249 patients, 38.6%, respectively, Z = 2.29, p = 0.020), due to a larger training intensity. Only single RCTs have been reported for other devices and etiologies.

CONCLUSION:

The introduction of end-effector based gait machines has opened a new succesful chapter in gait rehabilitation after CNS lesion.

PMID:
23949037
DOI:
10.3233/NRE-130930
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for IOS Press
    Loading ...
    Support Center