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Cancer Lett. 2014 Apr 10;345(2):271-8. doi: 10.1016/j.canlet.2013.07.031. Epub 2013 Aug 11.

Inflammation and cancer stem cells.

Author information

1
School of Medicine, Deakin University, Pigdons Road, Waurn Ponds, Victoria 3217, Australia. Electronic address: sarah.shigdar@deakin.edu.au.
2
Cancer Care Centre, St. George Hospital, and St. George Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW 2052, Australia.
3
Department of Organic Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.
4
School of Medicine, Deakin University, Pigdons Road, Waurn Ponds, Victoria 3217, Australia.
5
Dalian Sixth People's Hospital, Dalian 116033, China.
6
School of Medical Science and Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Southport, Australia.
7
Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Victoria, Australia.
8
Suzhou Key Laboratory of Nanobiomedicine, Division of Nanobiomedicine, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou, Jiangsu, China.
9
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA.
10
School of Medicine, Deakin University, Pigdons Road, Waurn Ponds, Victoria 3217, Australia. Electronic address: wduan@deakin.edu.au.

Abstract

Cancer stem cells are becoming recognised as being responsible for metastasis and treatment resistance. The complex cellular and molecular network that regulates cancer stem cells and the role that inflammation plays in cancer progression are slowly being elucidated. Cytokines, secreted by tumour associated immune cells, activate the necessary pathways required by cancer stem cells to facilitate cancer stem cells progressing through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and migrating to distant sites. Once in situ, these cancer stem cells can secrete their own attractants, thus providing an environment whereby these cells can continue to propagate the tumour in a secondary niche.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer stem cells; Epigenetics; Epithelial–mesenchymal transition; Inflammation; Microenvironment

PMID:
23941828
DOI:
10.1016/j.canlet.2013.07.031
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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