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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2013 Aug 27;110(35):14196-201. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1303312110. Epub 2013 Aug 12.

Language can boost otherwise unseen objects into visual awareness.

Author information

1
University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA. lupyan@wisc.edu

Abstract

Linguistic labels (e.g., "chair") seem to activate visual properties of the objects to which they refer. Here we investigated whether language-based activation of visual representations can affect the ability to simply detect the presence of an object. We used continuous flash suppression to suppress visual awareness of familiar objects while they were continuously presented to one eye. Participants made simple detection decisions, indicating whether they saw any image. Hearing a verbal label before the simple detection task changed performance relative to an uninformative cue baseline. Valid labels improved performance relative to no-label baseline trials. Invalid labels decreased performance. Labels affected both sensitivity (d') and response times. In addition, we found that the effectiveness of labels varied predictably as a function of the match between the shape of the stimulus and the shape denoted by the label. Together, the findings suggest that facilitated detection of invisible objects due to language occurs at a perceptual rather than semantic locus. We hypothesize that when information associated with verbal labels matches stimulus-driven activity, language can provide a boost to perception, propelling an otherwise invisible image into awareness.

KEYWORDS:

CFS; penetrability of perception; top-down effects; vision

PMID:
23940323
PMCID:
PMC3761589
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1303312110
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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