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Angle Orthod. 2014 Mar;84(2):297-303. doi: 10.2319/032213-234.1. Epub 2013 Aug 12.

Effect of cyclical forces on the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone remodeling during orthodontic tooth movement.

Author information

1
a  Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Craniofacial Sciences, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Conn.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the effect of externally applied cyclical (vibratory) forces on the rate of tooth movement, the structural integrity of the periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone remodeling.

METHODS:

Twenty-six female Sprague-Dawley rats (7 weeks old) were divided into four groups: CTRL (unloaded), VBO (molars receiving a vibratory stimulus only), TMO (molars receiving an orthodontic spring only), and TMO+VB (molars receiving an orthodontic spring and the additional vibratory stimulus). In TMO and TMO+VB groups, the rat first molars were moved mesially for 2 weeks using Nickel-Titanium coil spring delivering 25 g of force. In VBO and TMO+VB groups, cyclical forces at 0.4 N and 30 Hz were applied occlusally twice a week for 10 minutes. Microfocus X-ray computed tomography analysis and tooth movement measurements were performed on the dissected rat maxillae. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining and collagen fiber assessment were performed on histological sections.

RESULTS:

Cyclical forces significantly inhibited the amount of tooth movement. Histological analysis showed marked disorganization of the collagen fibril structure of the periodontal ligament during tooth movement. Tooth movement caused a significant increase in osteoclast parameters on the compression side of alveolar bone and a significant decrease in bone volume fraction in the molar region compared to controls.

CONCLUSIONS:

Tooth movement was significantly inhibited by application of cyclical forces.

PMID:
23937517
PMCID:
PMC4100684
DOI:
10.2319/032213-234.1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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