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PLoS Genet. 2013;9(8):e1003682. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1003682. Epub 2013 Aug 1.

In vivo bypass of 8-oxodG.

Author information

1
Department of Biology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Abstract

8-oxoG is one of the most common and mutagenic DNA base lesions caused by oxidative damage. However, it has not been possible to study the replication of a known 8-oxoG base in vivo in order to determine the accuracy of its replication, the influence of various components on that accuracy, and the extent to which an 8-oxoG might present a barrier to replication. We have been able to place a single 8-oxoG into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome in a defined location using single-strand oligonucleotide transformation and to study its replication in a fully normal chromosome context. During replication, 8-oxoG is recognized as a lesion and triggers a switch to translesion synthesis by Pol η, which replicates 8-oxoG with an accuracy (insertion of a C opposite the 8-oxoG) of approximately 94%. In the absence of Pol η, template switching to the newly synthesized sister chromatid is observed at least one third of the time; replication of the 8-oxoG in the absence of Pol η is less than 40% accurate. The mismatch repair (MMR) system plays an important role in 8-oxoG replication. Template switching is blocked by MMR and replication accuracy even in the absence of Pol η is approximately 95% when MMR is active. These findings indicate that in light of the overlapping mechanisms by which errors in 8-oxoG replication can be avoided in the cell, the mutagenic threat of 8-oxoG is due more to its abundance than the effect of a single lesion. In addition, the methods used here should be applicable to the study of any lesion that can be stably incorporated into synthetic oligonucleotides.

PMID:
23935538
PMCID:
PMC3731214
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pgen.1003682
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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