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Hippokratia. 2013 Jan;17(1):20-6.

Epidemiology of community-acquired Mycoplasma Pneumoniae respiratory tract infections among hospitalized Chinese children, including relationships with meteorological factors.

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1
Department of Respiratory Disease.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Mycoplasma Pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) is a common cause of respiratory tract infections (RTIs), especially in children. Combined diagnostic techniques have provided more reliable information about the epidemiology of infections by this pathogen. The relationship between M. pneumoniae RTIs and climatic conditions is not well documented in the literature.

AIMS:

To study the epidemiology of M. pneumoniae infections in hospitalized children with RTIs and its association with meteorological factors.

METHODS:

Samples were obtained from children with RTIs and tested for M. pneumoniae by PCR and ELISA. Meanwhile, meteorological factors were recorded.

RESULTS:

M. pneumoniae was identified in 11.02% of the 8,157 specimens. There were significant differences among the annual distribution of infections (χ(2) =130.13, P<0.0001) and among different seasons (χ(2) =93.59, P<0.0001). Of the total number of patients with M. pneumoniae infections, 14.5% were infected with more than one pathogen. M. pneumoniae infection strongly correlated with mean temperature. Children with a single M. pneumoniae infection had significantly higher neutrophil percentages and CRP levels than children with co-infections.

CONCLUSIONS:

M. pneumoniae is one of the most commonly held pathogens, according to the 5-year surveillance. M. pneumoniae infection has its own epidemic season, especially in the summer. Mean temperature is the main meteorological factor affecting the epidemiology of M. pneumoniae infections.

KEYWORDS:

Children; Epidemiology; Meteorological factors; Mycoplasma pneumoniae; Respiratory tract infections

PMID:
23935339
PMCID:
PMC3738272
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