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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2014 Feb;22(2):318-24. doi: 10.1002/oby.20589. Epub 2013 Sep 23.

Assessment of satiety depends on the energy density and portion size of the test meal.

Author information

1
Department of Nutritional Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Foods that enhance satiety can reduce overconsumption, but the availability of large portions of energy-dense foods may counter their benefits. The influence on meal energy intake of varying the energy density and portion size of food consumed after a preload shown to promote satiety was tested.

DESIGN AND METHODS:

In a crossover design, 46 women were served lunch on six days. On four days they ate a compulsory salad (300 g, 0.33 kcal/g). Unlike previous studies, instead of varying the preload, the subsequent test meal of pasta was varied between standard and increased levels of both energy density (1.25 or 1.66 kcal/g) and portion size (450 or 600 g). On two control days a salad was not served.

RESULTS:

Following the salad, the energy density and portion size of the test meal independently affected meal energy intake (both P < 0.02). Serving the higher-energy-dense pasta increased test meal intake by 153 ± 19 kcal and serving the larger portion of pasta increased test meal intake by 40 ± 16 kcal. Compared to having no salad, consuming the salad decreased test meal intake by 123 ± 18 kcal.

CONCLUSIONS:

The effect of satiety-enhancing foods can be influenced by the energy density and portion size of other foods at the meal.

PMID:
23929544
PMCID:
PMC3874079
DOI:
10.1002/oby.20589
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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