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PLoS One. 2013 Jul 26;8(7):e69977. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0069977. Print 2013.

Acetyl-l-carnitine and oxfenicine on cardiac pumping mechanics in streptozotocin-induced diabetes in male Wistar rats.

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1
Department of Surgery, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

In the treatment of patients with diabetes, one objective is an improvement of cardiac metabolism to alleviate the left ventricular (LV) function. For this study, we compared the effects of acetyl-l-carnitine (one of the carnitine derivatives) and of oxfenicine (a carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 inhibitor) on cardiac pumping mechanics in streptozotocin-induced diabetes in male Wistar rats, with a particular focus on the pressure-flow-volume relationship.

METHODS:

Diabetes was induced by a single tail vein injection of 55 mg kg(-1) streptozotocin. The diabetic animals were treated on a daily basis with either acetyl-L-carnitine (1 g L(-1) in drinking water) or oxfenicine (150 mg kg(-1) by oral gavage) for 8 wk. They were also compared with untreated age-matched diabetic controls. LV pressure and ascending aortic flow signals were recorded to calculate the maximal systolic elastance (E max) and the theoretical maximum flow (Q max). Physically, E max reflects the contractility of the myocardium as an intact heart, whereas Q max has an inverse relationship with the LV internal resistance.

RESULTS:

When comparing the diabetic rats with their age-matched controls, the cardiodynamic condition was characterized by a decline in E max associated with the unaltered Q max. Acetyl-l-carnitine (but not oxfenicine) had reduced cardiac levels of malondialdehyde in these insulin-deficient animals. However, treating with acetyl-l-carnitine or oxfenicine resulted in an increase in E max, which suggests that these 2 drugs may protect the contractile status from deteriorating in the diabetic heart. By contrast, Q max showed a significant fall after administration of oxfenicine, but not with acetyl-L-carnitine. The decrease in Q max corresponded to an increase in total vascular resistance when treated with oxfenicine.

CONCLUSIONS:

Acetyl-l-carnitine, but not oxfencine, optimizes the integrative nature of cardiac pumping mechanics by preventing the diabetes-induced deterioration in myocardial intrinsic contractility associated with unaltered LV internal resistance.

PMID:
23922880
PMCID:
PMC3724909
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0069977
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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