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Behav Cogn Psychother. 2014 Nov;42(6):718-30. doi: 10.1017/S1352465813000593. Epub 2013 Aug 7.

Core schemas across the continuum of psychosis: a comparison of clinical and non-clinical groups.

Author information

1
University of Manchester,UK.
2
Greater Manchester West Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust,UK.
3
University of East Anglia,Norwich,UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Research suggests that core schemas are important in both the development and maintenance of psychosis.

AIMS:

The aim of the study was to investigate and compare core schemas in four groups along the continuum of psychosis and examine the relationships between schemas and positive psychotic symptomatology.

METHOD:

A measure of core schemas was distributed to 20 individuals experiencing first-episode psychosis (FEP), 113 individuals with "at risk mental states" (ARMS), 28 participants forming a help-seeking clinical group (HSC), and 30 non-help-seeking individuals who endorse some psychotic-like experiences (NH).

RESULTS:

The clinical groups scored significantly higher than the NH group for negative beliefs about self and about others. No significant effects of group on positive beliefs about others were found. For positive beliefs about the self, the NH group scored significantly higher than the clinical groups. Furthermore, negative beliefs about self and others were related to positive psychotic symptomatology and to distress related to those experiences.

CONCLUSIONS:

Negative evaluations of the self and others appear to be characteristic of the appraisals of people seeking help for psychosis and psychosis-like experiences. The results support the literature that suggests that self-esteem should be a target for intervention. Future research would benefit from including comparison groups of people experiencing chronic psychosis and people who do not have any psychotic-like experiences.

PMID:
23920050
DOI:
10.1017/S1352465813000593
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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