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Yonsei Med J. 2013 Sep;54(5):1241-7. doi: 10.3349/ymj.2013.54.5.1241.

Clinical significance of serum CA-125 in Korean females with ascites.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710, Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Mycobacterium tuberculosis is endemic in Korea. Because tuberculous peritonitis is characterized by ascites, abdominal pain, abdominal mass and elevation of serum CA-125, it can be confused with ovarian malignancies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of serum CA-125 level in the differential diagnosis of tuberculous peritonitis and ovarian malignancy in a Mycobacterium tuberculosis-endemic area.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The medical records of patients diagnosed with tuberculous peritonitis (n=48) or epithelial ovarian malignancy (n=370) at Samsung Medical Center from January 2000 to October 2009 were retrospectively reviewed.

RESULTS:

Median serum CA-125 level in the epithelial ovarian cancer group was significantly higher than that in the tuberculous peritonitis group (p ≤ 0.01). Only one patient (2.1%) in the tuberculous peritonitis group had a serum CA-125 level over 2000 U/mL. However, 109 patients (29.5%) in the epithelial ovarian cancer group had a serum CA-125 level over 2000 U/mL. At the CA-125 ranges of 400 to 599 and 600 to 799, the proportions of those with tuberculous peritonitis were 24% and 21.9%, respectively. At a serum CA-125 level over 1000 U/mL, however, the proportion of tuberculous peritonitis was much lower (2.1%).

CONCLUSION:

Tuberculous peritonitis should be considered in the evaluation of female patients with ascites and high serum CA-125.

KEYWORDS:

Ascites; epithelial ovarian cancer; serum CA-125; tuberculous peritonitis

PMID:
23918576
PMCID:
PMC3743200
DOI:
10.3349/ymj.2013.54.5.1241
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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