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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2013 Aug 20;110(34):13971-5. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1311887110. Epub 2013 Aug 5.

Brief meditation training induces smoking reduction.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology and Texas Tech Neuroimaging Institute, Texas Tech University, TX 79409, USA. yiyuan.tang@ttu.edu

Abstract

More than 5 million deaths a year are attributable to tobacco smoking, but attempts to help people either quit or reduce their smoking often fail, perhaps in part because the intention to quit activates brain networks related to craving. We recruited participants interested in general stress reduction and randomly assigned them to meditation training or a relaxation training control. Among smokers, 2 wk of meditation training (5 h in total) produced a significant reduction in smoking of 60%; no reduction was found in the relaxation control. Resting-state brain scans showed increased activity for the meditation group in the anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortex, brain areas related to self-control. These results suggest that brief meditation training improves self-control capacity and reduces smoking.

KEYWORDS:

addiction; anterior cingulate cortex; brain state; integrative body–mind training; mindfulness

PMID:
23918376
PMCID:
PMC3752264
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1311887110
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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