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Hum Vaccin Immunother. 2013 Dec;9(12):2613-7. doi: 10.4161/hv.25910. Epub 2013 Aug 5.

Willingness to receive a hypothetical avian influenza vaccine among US military personnel in mid-deployment.

Author information

1
Naval Medical Research Center; Enteric Diseases Department; Silver Spring, MD USA.
2
George Washington University; School of Public Health and Health Services; Washington, DC USA.
3
Infectious Diseases Clinical Research Program; Uniformed Services University; Bethesda, MD USA.
4
Walter Reed National Military Medical Center; Bethesda, MD USA.
5
United States Naval Medical Research Unit No. 3; Cairo, Egypt.

Abstract

Though no avian influenza vaccine currently exists, development efforts have increased. Given recent reports of suboptimal vaccination rates among US military personnel, we sought to assess factors associated with a willingness to receive a hypothetical avian influenza vaccine. A self-administered questionnaire was completed by US military personnel during mid-deployment to Iraq, Afghanistan, and surrounding regions. Respondents were predominately male (86.2%), Army (72.1%), and enlisted (86.3%) with a mean age of 29.6 y. The majority (77.1%) agreed to receive an avian influenza vaccine if available. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) identified two factors, vaccine importance and disease risk, that best described the individual perceptions and both were associated with an increased willingness to receive the hypothetical vaccine (OR: 8.2 and 1.6, respectively). Importantly, after controlling for these factors differences in the willingness to receive this hypothetical vaccine were observed across gender and branch of service. These results indicated that targeted education on vaccine safety and efficacy as well as disease risk may modify vaccination patterns in this population.

KEYWORDS:

avian influenza; disease risk; factor analysis; military; vaccine; vaccine safety

PMID:
23917256
PMCID:
PMC4162042
DOI:
10.4161/hv.25910
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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