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Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2015 Jan;23(1):59-71.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jagp.2013.04.011. Epub 2013 Aug 1.

Shape abnormalities of the caudate nucleus correlate with poorer gait and balance: results from a subset of the LADIS study.

Author information

1
Research Centre for the Neurosciences of Ageing, Academic Unit of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine, Australian National University Medical School, Canberra Hospital, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia. Electronic address: mmacfarlane1@gmail.com.
2
Research Centre for the Neurosciences of Ageing, Academic Unit of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine, Australian National University Medical School, Canberra Hospital, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia; Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
3
Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre, Royal Melbourne Hospital and University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
4
Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
5
Neuroimaging Research and Analysis Laboratories, Carolina Institute of Developmental Disabilities, Departments of Psychiatry and Computer Science, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC.
6
Division of Medical Imaging and Technology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital in Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
7
Department of Neurological Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland; Department of Neurology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
8
Memory Disorders Research Group, Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
9
Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark.
10
Department of Neurology, Universitäts Medizin Mannheim UMM, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany.
11
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Functional deficits seen in several neurodegenerative disorders have been linked with dysfunction in frontostriatal circuits and with associated shape alterations in striatal structures. The severity of visible white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) on magnetic resonance imaging has been found to correlate with poorer performance on measures of gait and balance. This study aimed to determine whether striatal volume and shape changes were correlated with gait dysfunction.

METHODS:

Magnetic resonance imaging scans and clinical gait/balance data (scores from the Short Physical Performance Battery [SPPB]) were sourced from 66 subjects in the previously published LADIS trial, performed in nondisabled individuals older than age 65 years with WMHs at study entry. Data were obtained at study entry and at 3-year follow-up. Caudate nuclei and putamina were manually traced using a previously published method and volumes calculated. The relationships between volume and physical performance on the SPPB were investigated with shape analysis using the spherical harmonic shape description toolkit.

RESULTS:

There was no correlation between the severity of WMHs and striatal volumes. Caudate nuclei volume correlated with performance on the SPPB at baseline but not at follow-up, with subsequent shape analysis showing left caudate changes occurred in areas corresponding to inputs of the dorsolateral prefrontal, premotor, and motor cortex. There was no correlation between putamen volumes and performance on the SPPB.

CONCLUSION:

Disruption in frontostriatal circuits may play a role in mediating poorer physical performance in individuals with WMHs. Striatal volume and shape changes may be suitable biomarkers for functional changes in this population.

KEYWORDS:

MRI; Striatum; caudate nucleus; gait; white matter disease

PMID:
23916546
PMCID:
PMC4234689
DOI:
10.1016/j.jagp.2013.04.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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