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Eur Psychiatry. 2013 Sep;28(7):417-22. doi: 10.1016/j.eurpsy.2013.06.002. Epub 2013 Aug 2.

Axis I psychiatric diagnoses in adolescents and young adults with 22q11 deletion syndrome.

Author information

1
Emory University School of Medicine, Emory Autism Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 1551 Shoup Court, 30322 Atlanta, Georgia, United States. Electronic address: oousley@emory.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) associates with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSDs), autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), and other psychiatric disorders, but co-occurrence of diagnoses are not well described.

METHODS:

We evaluated the co-occurrence of SSDs, ASDs and other axis I psychiatric diagnoses in 31 adolescents and adults with 22q11DS, assessing ASDs using either stringent Collaborative Program for Excellence in Autism (ASD-CPEA) criteria, or less stringent DSM-IV criteria alone (ASD-DSM-IV).

RESULTS:

Ten (32%) individuals met criteria for an SSD, five (16%) for ASD-CPEA, and five others (16%) for ASD-DSM-IV. Of those with ASD-CPEA, one (20%) met SSD criteria. Of those with ASD-DSM-IV, four (80%) met SSD criteria. Depressive disorders (8 individuals; 26%) and anxiety disorders (7; 23%) sometimes co-occurred with SSDs and ASDs. SSDs, ASDs, and anxiety occurred predominantly among males and depression predominantly among females.

CONCLUSIONS:

Individuals with 22q11DS can manifest SSDs in the presence or absence of ASDs and other axis I diagnoses. The results suggest that standard clinical care should include childhood screening for ASDs, and later periodic screening for all axis I diagnoses.

KEYWORDS:

Affective disorders; Anxiety disorders; Autism; Genetics; Schizophrenia and psychosis

PMID:
23916466
DOI:
10.1016/j.eurpsy.2013.06.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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