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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2014 Jan;22(1):119-30. doi: 10.1002/oby.20587. Epub 2013 Sep 10.

Short-term overeating results in incomplete energy intake compensation regardless of energy density or macronutrient composition.

Author information

1
Pennington Biomedical Research Center, 6400 Perkins Road, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the effects of overeating (140% of energy requirements) a high-fat low-energy density diet (HF/LED, 1.05 kcal/g), high-fat high-energy density diet (HF/HED, 1.60 kcal/g), and high-carbohydrate (HC) LED (1.05 kcal/g) for 2-days on subsequent 4-day energy intake (EI), activity levels, appetite, and mood.

DESIGN AND METHODS:

Using a randomized cross-over design, energy expenditure and EI were standardized during overeating.

RESULTS:

In 20 adults with a mean ± SD BMI of 30.7 ± 4.6 kg/m(2) , EI was not suppressed until the second day after overeating and accounted for ∼30% of the excess EI. Reductions in EI did not differ among the three diets or across days. Overeating had no effect on subsequent energy expenditure but steps/day decreased after the HC/LED and HF/HED. Sleep time was increased after the HF/HED compared to both LEDs. After overeating a HF/HED vs. HF/LED, carbohydrate cravings, hunger, prospective food consumption, and sadness increased and satisfaction, relaxation, and tranquility decreased.

CONCLUSIONS:

Diet type, time, or their interaction had no impact on compensation over 4 days. No adaptive thermogenesis was observed. The HF/HED vs. HF/LED had detrimental effects on food cravings, appetite, and mood. These results suggest short-term overeating is associated with incomplete compensation.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01653145 NCT01653886.

PMID:
23913807
PMCID:
PMC3873377
DOI:
10.1002/oby.20587
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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