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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Dec;21(12):E555-60. doi: 10.1002/oby.20579. Epub 2013 Sep 5.

Acute sleep deprivation increases food purchasing in men.

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1
Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate if acute sleep deprivation affects food purchasing choices in a mock supermarket.

DESIGN AND METHODS:

On the morning after one night of total sleep deprivation (TSD) or after one night of sleep, 14 normal-weight men were given a fixed budget (300 SEK-approximately 50 USD). They were instructed to purchase as much as they could out of a possible 40 items, including 20 high-caloric foods (>2 kcal/g) and 20 low-caloric foods (<2 kcal/g). The prices of the high-caloric foods were then varied (75%, 100% (reference price), and 125%) to determine if TSD affects the flexibility of food purchasing. Before the task, participants received a standardized breakfast, thereby minimizing the potential confound produced by hunger. In addition, morning plasma concentrations of the orexigenic hormone ghrelin were measured under fasting conditions.

RESULTS:

Independent of both type of food offered and price condition, sleep-deprived men purchased significantly more calories (+9%) and grams (+18%) of food than they did after one night of sleep (both P < 0.05). Morning plasma ghrelin concentrations were also higher after TSD (P < 0.05). However, this increase did not correlate with the effects of TSD on food purchasing.

CONCLUSIONS:

This experiment demonstrates that acute sleep loss alters food purchasing behavior in men.

PMID:
23908148
DOI:
10.1002/oby.20579
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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