Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Support Care Cancer. 2013 Dec;21(12):3337-43. doi: 10.1007/s00520-013-1906-4. Epub 2013 Aug 2.

Treatment regret and quality of life following radical prostatectomy.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Houston, 126 Heyne Building, Houston, TX, 77204, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Negative physical functioning outcomes including incontinence and erectile dysfunction are relatively common following radical prostatectomy (RP) and are associated with treatment regret and compromised quality of life (QOL). The role that treatment regret may have in influencing the association between prostate-specific QOL (i.e., sexual, urinary, bowl functioning) and general QOL following RP has not been examined.

METHOD:

This study examined the associations of treatment regret, general QOL (36-item Short Form Health Survey physical and mental health (MCS) composite scores), and prostate-specific QOL (Prostate Cancer QOL sexual, urinary, bowl functioning, and cancer worry subscales) in 95 men who underwent RP for prostate cancer.

RESULTS:

Multiple regression analyses indicated that poorer sexual and urinary functioning was associated with poorer MCS. Additionally, men with lower sexual and urinary functioning reported greater treatment regret. Treatment regret was also associated with lower MCS. Finally, treatment regret partially mediated the effects of both sexual and urinary functioning on MCS.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings suggest that regardless of a patient's prostate-specific QOL, reducing treatment regret may improve mental health following RP. Though there are limited options to alter patients' sexual or urinary functioning following RP, treatment regret may be a modifiable contributor to post-surgical adjustment and QOL.

PMID:
23907238
PMCID:
PMC3823814
DOI:
10.1007/s00520-013-1906-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center