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Cold Spring Harb Perspect Med. 2013 Aug 1;3(8). pii: a014217. doi: 10.1101/cshperspect.a014217.

MYC, metabolism, cell growth, and tumorigenesis.

Author information

  • 1Abramson Cancer Center, Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19072, USA. dangvchi@exchange.upenn.edu

Abstract

The MYC proto-oncogene is frequently activated in human cancers through a variety of mechanisms. Its deregulated expression, unconstrained by inactivation of key checkpoints, such as p53, contributes to tumorigenesis. Unlike its normal counterpart, which is restrained by negative regulators, the unleashed MYC oncogene produces a transcription factor that alters global gene expression through transcriptional regulation, resulting in tumorigenesis. Key genes involved in ribosomal and mitochondrial biogenesis, glucose and glutamine metabolism, lipid synthesis, and cell-cycle progression are robustly activated by MYC, contributing to the acquisition of bioenergetics substrates for the cancer cell to grow and proliferate.

PMID:
23906881
PMCID:
PMC3721271
DOI:
10.1101/cshperspect.a014217
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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