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BMC Fam Pract. 2013 Jul 30;14:108. doi: 10.1186/1471-2296-14-108.

A small unconditional non-financial incentive suggests an increase in survey response rates amongst older general practitioners (GPs): a randomised controlled trial study.

Author information

1
University Centre for Rural Health, Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, 61 Uralba Street, PO Box 3074, Lismore, NSW 2480, Australia. sabrina.pit@sydney.edu.au

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Few studies have investigated the effect of small unconditional non-monetary incentives on survey response rates amongst GPs or medical practitioners. This study assessed the effectiveness of offering a small unconditional non-financial incentive to increase survey response rates amongst general practitioners within a randomised controlled trial (RCT).

METHODS:

An RCT was conducted within a general practice survey that investigated how to prolong working lives amongst ageing GPs in Australia. GPs (nā€‰=ā€‰125) were randomised to receive an attractive pen or no pen during their first invitation for participation in a survey. GPs could elect to complete the survey online or via mail. Two follow up reminders were sent without a pen to both groups. The main outcome measure was response rates.

RESULTS:

The response rate for GPs who received a pen was higher in the intervention group (61.9%) compared to the control group (46.8%). This study did not find a statistically significant effect of a small unconditional non-financial incentive (in the form of a pen) on survey response rates amongst GPs (Odds ratio, 95% confidence interval: 1.85 (0.91 to 3.77). No GPs completed the online version.

CONCLUSION:

A small unconditional non-financial incentives, in the form of a pen, may improve response rates for GPs.

PMID:
23899116
PMCID:
PMC3733617
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2296-14-108
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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