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Spinal Cord. 2013 Oct;51(10):765-7. doi: 10.1038/sc.2013.74. Epub 2013 Jul 30.

Preserved corticospinal conduction without voluntary movement after spinal cord injury.

Author information

1
1] Non-invasive Brain Stimulation and Human Motor Control Laboratory, Burke Medical Research Institute, Departments of Neurology and Neuroscience, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, White Plains, NY, USA [2] Australian Neuro-muscular Research Institute and Centre for Neuromuscular and Neurological Disorders, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia [3] Berenson-Allen Center for Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN:

Case report.

OBJECTIVES:

To identify preserved corticomotor connection in chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) in the absence of clinically observable movement.

SETTING:

Rehabilitation Hospital and Medical Research Institute, NY, USA.

METHODS:

The motor-evoked potential (MEP) response to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was recorded using surface electromyography from the right biceps brachii, extersor carpi radialis (ECR), flexor carpi radialis (FCR) and abductor pollicis brevis (APB) muscles in a 31-year-old male traumatic SCI chronic patient-ASIA B, injury level C5. Motor power scores were additionally obtained from a clinician blinded to the results of TMS.

RESULTS:

TMS could consistently elicit MEPs of normal latency, phase and amplitude, in the severely affected ECR muscle but not the similarly affected FCR muscle. The response in proximal and unaffected biceps muscle was larger than the healthy subject, whereas no response was obtained in the distal APB muscle as expected.

CONCLUSION:

TMS can identify residual pathways not apparent from clinical assessment alone, which may have prescriptive value for rehabilitation.

PMID:
23896664
PMCID:
PMC4514766
DOI:
10.1038/sc.2013.74
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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