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Inhal Toxicol. 2013 Aug;25(9):498-508. doi: 10.3109/08958378.2013.806614. Epub 2013 Jul 29.

Effects of copy center particles on the lungs: a toxicological characterization using a Balb/c mouse model.

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1
Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology, Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Printers and photocopiers release respirable particles into the air. Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) have been recently incorporated into toner formulations but their potential toxicological effects have not been well studied.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the biological responses to copier-emitted particles in the lungs using a mouse model.

METHODS:

Particulate matter (PM) from a university copy center was sampled and fractionated into three distinct sizes, two of which (PM0.1 and PM0.1-2.5) were evaluated in this study. The particles were extracted and dispersed in deionized water and RPMI/10% FBS. Hydrodynamic diameter and zeta potential were evaluated by dynamic light scattering. The toxicological potential of these particles was studied using 8-week-old male Balb/c mice. Mice were intratracheally instilled with 0.2, 0.6, 2.0 mg/kg bw of either the PM0.1 and PM0.1-2.5 size fractions. Fe2O3 and welding fumes were used as comparative materials, while RPMI/10% FBS was used as the vehicle control. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed 24 hours post-instillation. The BAL fluid was analyzed for total and differential cell counts, and biochemical markers of injury and inflammation.

RESULTS:

Particle size- and dose-dependent pulmonary effects were found. Specifically, mice instilled with PM0.1 (2.0 mg/kg bw) had significant increases in neutrophil number, lactate dehydrogenase and albumin compared to vehicle control. Likewise, pro-inflammatory cytokines were elevated in mice exposed to PM0.1 (2.0 mg/kg bw) compared to other groups.

CONCLUSION:

Our results indicate that exposure to copier-emitted nanoparticles may induce lung injury and inflammation. Further exposure assessment and toxicological investigations are necessary to address this emerging environmental health pollutant.

PMID:
23895351
PMCID:
PMC4393332
DOI:
10.3109/08958378.2013.806614
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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