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Muscle Nerve. 2013 Nov;48(5):705-10. doi: 10.1002/mus.23964.

Late-onset myasthenia gravis: a review when incidence in older adults keeps increasing.

Author information

1
Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine and Brain Research Centre, UBC Hospital, University of British Columbia, 2211 Westbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2B5, Canada.

Abstract

We define late-onset myasthenia gravis (LOMG) when symptoms appear at ≥65 years of age. There has been a continuous increase in the incidence of LOMG with a clear male predominance. Commonly, patients present with focal (ocular or bulbar) weakness. A high index of suspicion required to achieve early diagnosis and to improve prognosis. Management options include acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, steroids, and immunosuppressants. The most controversial issue in treatment is thymectomy, because not enough data are available. Successful treatment is associated with improved survival, and death is often secondary to comorbidities.

KEYWORDS:

late onset; myasthenia gravis; older adults; thymectomy; treatment

PMID:
23893883
DOI:
10.1002/mus.23964
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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