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Radiol Med. 2013 Sep;118(6):909-16. doi: 10.1007/s11547-013-0969-0. Epub 2013 Jul 20.

Percutaneous nephrostomy performed on kidneys with a thin renal cortex: a retrospective study of daily urine output in 46 nephrostomy procedures.

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1
Department of Diagnostic Radiology, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, No.138, Shengli Rd., North Dist., Tainan, 704, Taiwan (R.O.C.).

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study investigated whether a thin renal cortex or any morphological kidney measurements can be predictors of post percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) renal function, thereby lessening the need for the procedure.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

All patients underwent unilateral PCN that were performed under sonographic and fluoroscopic guidance. Kidney morphological measurements were subsequently taken to measure residual renal function; a thin renal cortex was defined from a computed tomography (CT) showing a cortical thickness <10 mm. Urine output was recorded daily, with patients divided into anuric and nonanuric groups.

RESULTS:

Morphological measurements of residual renal function, such as renal length (p=0.004), renal width (p=0.004), renal thickness (p=0.008), and renal size (p=0.004) were significantly higher in nonanuric than anuric patients. Urine output increased by 85.47 ml/day for every millimetre increase in renal width (p=0.026) and 65.31 ml/day for every millimetre increase in renal thickness (p=0.024). Simple linear regression analyses showed that cancer patients had a significantly lower urine output (358.73 ml/day; p=0.046) than those without cancer.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study showed that urine output and other clinical data can provide an index to evaluate residual renal function before deciding to perform PCN procedures.

PMID:
23892958
DOI:
10.1007/s11547-013-0969-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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