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J Nurs Adm. 2013 Jul-Aug;43(7-8):415-21. doi: 10.1097/NNA.0b013e31829d61c6.

Workplace incivility and new graduate nurses' mental health: the protective role of resiliency.

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1
Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. hkl@uwo.ca

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between coworker, physician, and supervisor workplace incivility and new graduate nurses' mental health and the protective role of personal resiliency.

BACKGROUND:

Positive interpersonal relationships in healthcare work environments are important for new graduate nurses' career transition and commitment. Workplace incivility threatens new graduate nurses' health and well-being. Personal resiliency helps employees to recover from negative stressors and may protect new nurses from the negative effects of workplace incivility.

METHODS:

We surveyed 272 new graduate nurses in Ontario to explore the influence of 3 forms of workplace incivility and personal resiliency on new nurses' mental health.

RESULTS:

All sources of incivility were related to poor mental health. Results suggest that personal resiliency may protect nurses from the negative effects of incivility.

CONCLUSIONS:

New nurses are experiencing workplace incivility from a variety of sources in their work environments, which have detrimental effects on their workplace well-being.

PMID:
23892307
DOI:
10.1097/NNA.0b013e31829d61c6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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