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Int J Obes (Lond). 2014 Jan;38(1):16-21. doi: 10.1038/ijo.2013.135. Epub 2013 Jul 26.

Vigorous physical activity and longitudinal associations with cardiometabolic risk factors in youth.

Author information

1
Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
2
Ever Active Schools, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
3
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
4
Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
5
1] School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada [2] Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
6
Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia.
7
Black Gold Regional Schools, Leduc, Alberta, Canada.
8
Faculty of Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
9
Menzies Centre for Health Policy, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
10
Manitoba Institute of Child Health, Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
11
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the longitudinal associations between different physical activity (PA) intensities and cardiometabolic risk factors among a sample of Canadian youth.

METHODS:

The findings are based on a 2-year prospective cohort study in a convenience sample of 315 youth aged 9-15 years at baseline from rural and urban schools in Alberta, Canada. Different intensities (light, moderate and vigorous) of PA were objectively assessed with Actical accelerometers. The main outcome measures were body mass index (BMI) z-score, waist circumference, cardiorespiratory fitness and systolic blood pressure at 2-year-follow-up and conditional BMI z-score velocity. A series of linear regression models were conducted to investigate the associations after adjusting for potential confounders.

RESULTS:

At follow-up, cardiorespiratory fitness increased (quartile 1 vs quartile 4=43.3 vs 50.2; P(trend)<0.01) and waist circumference decreased (quartile 1 vs quartile 4=79.0 vs 72.6; P(trend)=0.04; boys only) in a dose-response manner across quartiles of baseline vigorous-intensity PA. A similar trend was observed for systolic blood pressure (quartile 1 vs quartile 4=121.8 vs 115.3; P(trend)=0.07; boys only). Compared with quartile 1 of vigorous-intensity PA, BMI z-score at follow-up and conditional BMI z-score velocity were significantly lower in the quartile 2 and 3 (P<0.05). Waist circumference at follow-up also decreased (quartile 1 vs quartile 4=75.3 vs 73.8; P(trend)=0.04) across quartiles of baseline moderate-intensity PA.

CONCLUSIONS:

Time spent in vigorous-intensity PA was associated with several positive health outcomes 2 years later. These findings suggest that high-intensity activities in youth help to reduce the risk for several chronic diseases.

PMID:
23887061
DOI:
10.1038/ijo.2013.135
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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