Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Transplantation. 2013 Nov 15;96(9):843-9. doi: 10.1097/TP.0b013e3182a049fd.

Risk factors and outcomes of bacteremia caused by drug-resistant ESKAPE pathogens in solid-organ transplant recipients.

Author information

1
1 Infectious Disease Department, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica de Bellvitge, University of Barcelona, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. 2 Microbiology Department, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Respiratorias, Insituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain. 3 General Surgery Department, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica de Bellvitge, University of Barcelona, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. 4 Gastroenterology Department, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica de Bellvitge, University of Barcelona, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. 5 Cardiology Department, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica de Bellvitge, University of Barcelona, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. 6 Nefrology Department, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica de Bellvitge, University of Barcelona, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. 7 Address correspondence to: Marta Bodro, Infectious Disease Department, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica de Bellvitge, University of Barcelona, 08907 L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although infections due to the six ESKAPE pathogens have recently been identified as a serious emerging problem, information regarding bacteremia caused by these organisms in solid-organ transplant (SOT) recipients is lacking. We sought to determine the frequency, risk factors, and outcomes of bacteremia due to drug-resistant ESKAPE (rESKAPE) organisms in liver, kidney, and heart adult transplant recipients.

METHODS:

All episodes of bacteremia prospectively documented in hospitalized SOT recipients from 2007 to 2012 were analyzed.

RESULTS:

Of 276 episodes of bacteremia, 54 (19.6%) were due to rESKAPE strains (vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium [0], methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [5], extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae [10], carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii [8], carbapenem- and quinolone-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa [26], and derepressed chromosomal β-lactam and extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacter species [5]). Factors independently associated with rESKAPE bacteremia were prior transplantation, septic shock, and prior antibiotic therapy. Patients with rESKAPE bacteremia more often received inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy than the others (41% vs. 21.6%; P=0.01). Overall case-fatality rate (30 days) was higher in patients with rESKAPE bacteremia (35.2% vs. 14.4%; P=0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Bacteremia due to rESKAPE pathogens is frequent in SOT recipients and causes significant morbidity and mortality. rESKAPE organisms should be considered when selecting empirical antibiotic therapy for hospitalized SOT recipients presenting with septic shock, particularly those with prior transplantation and antibiotic use.

PMID:
23883973
DOI:
10.1097/TP.0b013e3182a049fd
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer
Loading ...
Support Center