Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nurse Educ Pract. 2014 Jan;14(1):12-7. doi: 10.1016/j.nepr.2013.06.003. Epub 2013 Jul 20.

'Putting it together': unfolding case studies and high-fidelity simulation in the first-year of an undergraduate nursing curriculum.

Author information

1
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Nutrition, James Cook University, PO Box 6811, Cairns, QLD 4870, Australia. Electronic address: jane.mills@jcu.edu.au.
2
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Nutrition, James Cook University, PO Box 6811, Cairns, QLD 4870, Australia. Electronic address: caryn.west@jcu.edu.au.
3
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Nutrition, James Cook University, PO Box 6811, Cairns, QLD 4870, Australia. Electronic address: tanya.langtree@jcu.edu.au.
4
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Nutrition, James Cook University, PO Box 6811, Cairns, QLD 4870, Australia. Electronic address: kim.usher@jcu.edu.au.
5
19A Wenworth Ave, Waitara, NSW 2077, Australia. Electronic address: renee.henry@hotmail.com.
6
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Nutrition, James Cook University, PO Box 6811, Cairns, QLD 4870, Australia. Electronic address: jennifer.chamberlainsalaun@jcu.edu.au.
7
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Nutrition, James Cook University, PO Box 6811, Cairns, QLD 4870, Australia. Electronic address: matt.mason@jcu.edu.au.

Abstract

The use of simulation as a teaching strategy in undergraduate nursing education is gaining increasing credibility and popularity. This article describes a study undertaken to evaluate first-year undergraduate nursing students' level of satisfaction with a new model of teaching clinical skills using unfolding case studies in a high-fidelity simulated clinical setting. The design incorporated a case study design conducted over 4 × 6 h simulation sessions. Participants included 47 first year Bachelor of Nursing Science students, three academic staff and two standardised patients. Findings from the study provide qualitative and quantitative evidence to support a high fidelity simulated model of teaching clinical skills development for first year undergraduate nursing students. High positive scores in all sections of the student survey provide quantitative evidence of student's satisfaction with all elements of the teaching model and qualitative data from interviews supporting this claim. Additionally, analysis of interview data provides qualitative evidence to support the value of the learning experience for students and academics, and students desire to participate more frequently in simulation sessions.

KEYWORDS:

Baccalaureate; Curriculum; Education; Evaluation studies; Nursing; Patient simulation; Qualitative research

PMID:
23880300
DOI:
10.1016/j.nepr.2013.06.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center