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Diabetes Care. 2013 Nov;36(11):3766-71. doi: 10.2337/dc13-0065. Epub 2013 Jul 22.

Matrix Gla protein species and risk of cardiovascular events in type 2 diabetic patients.

Author information

1
Corresponding author: Geertje W. Dalmeijer, g.w.dalmeijer@umcutrecht.nl.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the relationship of circulating matrix Gla protein (MGP) species with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) or coronary heart disease (CHD) in type 2 diabetic patients.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

EPIC-NL is a prospective cohort study among 40,011 Dutch men and women. At baseline (1993-1997), 518 participants were known to have type 2 diabetes. MGP levels were measured by ELISA techniques in baseline plasma samples. The incidence of fatal and nonfatal CVD and CVD subtypes-CHD, peripheral arterial disease (PAD), heart failure, and stroke-were obtained by linkage to national registers. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs), adjusted for sex, waist-to-hip ratio, physical activity, and history of CVD.

RESULTS:

During a median 11.2 years of follow-up, 160 cases of CVD were documented. Higher circulating desphospho-uncarboxylated MGP (dp-ucMGP) levels were significantly associated with higher risk of CVD, with an HR per SD (HRSD) of 1.21 (95% CI 1.06-1.38), PAD (HRSD 1.32 [95% CI 1.07-1.65]), and heart failure (HRSD 1.75 [95% CI 1.42-2.17]) after adjustment. Higher circulating dp-ucMGP levels were not related to risk of CHD (HRSD 1.12 [95% CI 0.94-1.34]) or stroke (HRSD 1.05 [95% CI 0.73-1.49]). Circulating desphospho-carboxylated MGP and circulating total-uncarboxylated MGP levels were not associated with CVD or CVD subtypes.

CONCLUSIONS:

High dp-ucMGP levels were associated with increased CVD risk among type 2 diabetic patients, especially with the subtypes PAD and heart failure, while other MGP species were not related to CVD risk. These results suggest that a poor vitamin K status is associated with increased CVD risk.

PMID:
23877986
PMCID:
PMC3816877
DOI:
10.2337/dc13-0065
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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