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PLoS One. 2013 Jul 11;8(7):e68977. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0068977. Print 2013.

Anorectal transplantation in human cadavers: mock anorectal allotransplantation.

Author information

1
Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. arakij-pla@h.u-tokyo.ac.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Anorectal transplantation is a method for patients who have lost their anorectal function or suffer from congenital anorectal dysfunction to recover this function, and this has been investigated in experimental animal models using pigs, dogs, and rats. In this study, we performed an examination of anorectal transplantation in human cadavers to investigate whether this procedure could be performed in patients.

METHODS:

A 77-year-old woman cadaver 1 was used as the donor and a 98-year-old woman cadaver 2 was used as the recipient. Initially, abdominoperineal excision of the anus and rectum (the Miles' operation) was performed on the recipient. Next, an anorectal graft containing the pudendal nerve (PN), pudendal artery (PA), pudendal vein (PV), inferior mesenteric artery (IMA), and inferior mesenteric vein (IMV) was harvested from the donor. The donor graft was transplanted into the recipient by intestinal anastomosis and microneurovascular anastomoses orthotopically.

RESULTS:

The diameters of the PN (right/left), IMA, and IMV were 2.5 mm/2.5 mm, 2.0 mm, and 1.5 mm, respectively, in cadaver 1, and 2.0 mm/2.0 mm, 2.0 mm, and 2.0 mm, respectively, in cadaver 2. The length of the PN, PA, PV, IMA, and IMV in the graft was sufficient to allow proper anastomosis.

CONCLUSION:

This preliminary study indicated that human anorectal transplantation was possible anatomically and technically. We anticipate our study will aid in the potential future application of this procedure to human patients.

PMID:
23874833
PMCID:
PMC3708922
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0068977
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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