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Histochem Cell Biol. 2013 Oct;140(4):395-405. doi: 10.1007/s00418-013-1130-9. Epub 2013 Jul 20.

Regulation of Golgi signaling and trafficking by the KDEL receptor.

Author information

1
Institute of Protein Biochemistry (IBP), Via Pietro Castellino 111, 80131, Naples, Italy, cancino@tigem.it.

Abstract

Intracellular membrane transport involves the well-coordinated engagement of a series of organelles and molecular machineries that ensure that proteins are delivered to their correct cellular locations according to their function. To maintain the homeostasis of the secretory system, the fluxes of membranes and protein across the transport compartments must be precisely balanced. This control should rely on a mechanism that senses the movement of the traffic and generates the required homeostatic response. Due to its central position in the secretory pathway and to the large amounts of signaling molecules associated with it, the Golgi complex represents the ideal candidate for this regulation. The generation of autonomous signaling by the Golgi complex in response to the arrival of cargo from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has been experimentally addressed only in recent years. These studies have revealed that cargo moving from the ER to the Golgi activates a series of signaling pathways, the functional significance of which appears to be to maintain the homeostasis of the Golgi complex and to activate Golgi trafficking according to internal demand. We have termed this regulatory mechanism the Golgi control system. A key player in this Golgi control system is the KDEL receptor, which has previously been shown to retrieve chaperones back to the endoplasmic reticulum and more recently to behave as a signaling receptor. Here, we discuss the particular role of KDEL receptor signaling in the regulation of important pathways involved in the maintenance of the homeostasis of the transport apparatus, and in particular, of the Golgi complex.

PMID:
23873287
DOI:
10.1007/s00418-013-1130-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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