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Clin Neurophysiol. 2014 Jan;125(1):53-62. doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2013.05.026. Epub 2013 Jul 15.

Auditory post-processing in a passive listening task is deficient in Alzheimer's disease.

Author information

1
Section for Clinical Neurophysiology and Multimodal Neuroimaging, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Technical University Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, D-01307 Dresden, Germany; Section for Experimental Psychopathology, Psychiatric Hospital, University of Heidelberg, Voßstraße 4, D-69115 Heidelberg, Germany; Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, Goethe University Frankfurt/Main, Deutschordenstraße 50, D-60528 Frankfurt/Main, Germany. Electronic address: Stephan.Bender@uniklinikum-dresden.de.
2
Section for Clinical Neurophysiology and Multimodal Neuroimaging, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Technical University Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, D-01307 Dresden, Germany.
3
Section for Biomagnetism, Department of Neurology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 120, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
4
Section for Experimental Psychopathology, Psychiatric Hospital, University of Heidelberg, Voßstraße 4, D-69115 Heidelberg, Germany; Psychiatric Hospital (SRH), Guttmannstrasse 1, D-76307 Karlsbad-Langensteinbach, Germany.
5
Section for Experimental Psychopathology, Psychiatric Hospital, University of Heidelberg, Voßstraße 4, D-69115 Heidelberg, Germany; Evangelical Hospital Bielefeld, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy Bethel, Department of Geriatric Psychiatry, Bethesdaweg 12, D-33617 Bielefeld, Germany.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate whether automatic auditory post-processing is deficient in patients with Alzheimer's disease and is related to sensory gating.

METHODS:

Event-related potentials were recorded during a passive listening task to examine the automatic transient storage of auditory information (short click pairs). Patients with Alzheimer's disease were compared to a healthy age-matched control group. A young healthy control group was included to assess effects of physiological aging.

RESULTS:

A bilateral frontal negativity in combination with deep temporal positivity occurring 500 ms after stimulus offset was reduced in patients with Alzheimer's disease, but was unaffected by physiological aging. Its amplitude correlated with short-term memory capacity, but was independent of sensory gating in healthy elderly controls. Source analysis revealed a dipole pair in the anterior temporal lobes.

CONCLUSION:

Results suggest that auditory post-processing is deficient in Alzheimer's disease, but is not typically related to sensory gating. The deficit could neither be explained by physiological aging nor by problems in earlier stages of auditory perception. Correlations with short-term memory capacity and executive control tasks suggested an association with memory encoding and/or overall cognitive control deficits.

SIGNIFICANCE:

An auditory late negative wave could represent a marker of auditory working memory encoding deficits in Alzheimer's disease.

KEYWORDS:

Aging; Alzheimer’s disease; Auditory evoked potential; Sensory gating; Source analysis; Working memory

PMID:
23867063
DOI:
10.1016/j.clinph.2013.05.026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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