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Neuroradiol J. 2013 Feb;26(1):3-17. Epub 2013 Mar 8.

Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging in patients with multiple sclerosis and its relationship with disability.

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1
Department of Neurology, Yıldırım Beyazıt University Atatürk Education and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.

Erratum in

  • Neuroradiol J. 2013 Oct;26(5):591. Kekliğkoğlu, H D [corrected to Keklikoğlu, H D].

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) can yield important information on the in vivo pathological processes affecting water diffusion. The aim of this study was to quantitatively define water diffusion in normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) distant from the plaque, in the plaque, and around the plaque, and to investigate the correlation of these changes with clinical disability. Conventional MRI and DTI scans were conducted in 30 patients with MS and 15 healthy individuals. Fractional anisotropy maps and visible diffusion coefficients were created and integrated with T2-weighted images. Regions of interest (ROIs) were placed on the plaques on the same side, white matter around the plaques and NAWM on the opposite side. Only the white matter of healthy individuals in the control group, and FA and ADC values were obtained for comparison. The highest FA and lowest ADC were detected in the control group at the periventricular region, cerebellar peduncle and at all ROIs irrespective of location. There was a significant difference in comparison to the control group at all ROIs in patients with MS (p < 0.001 for all comparisons). No significant correlation between diffusion parameters and expanded disability state scale (EDSS) scores was found in patients with MS. DTI may provide more accurate information on the damage due to the illness, compared to T2A sequences, but this damage may not be correlated with the clinical disability measured by EDSS score.

PMID:
23859160
PMCID:
PMC5278856
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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